Day Three: Baie Comeau

Oh what a day! We turned a two-hour drive into an all-day adventure by taking a few detours, planned and unplanned. And we’re glad we did!

As we left Tadoussac this morning, we chose a drive through the town that we thought would eventually link back to the highway. And we discovered…sand dunes. As far as the eye could see.

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We even found moose tracks as we explored the area. It turned out that the road was closed beyond a certain point (it became a bike path) so we had to backtrack a bit but the dunes were worth it.

Next stop was the Cap-de-Bon-Desir Interpretation and Observation Centre near Les Bergeronnes.

They have created an area among enormous flat rocks where you can sit for hours and watch whales surfacing and diving.

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And, yes, we saw whales! So close that you didn’t even need binoculars.

Awe-inspiring.

In another small community, we took a short hike through dunes and marshes to a long sand spit and saw…seals playing in the water! (I don’t have a photo of the seals but this is the bay).

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In addition, while we were there, a large flock of snow geese flew right over our heads.

Does it get any better than that? And this is only Day Three!

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Next we leave the St. Lawrence and turn north, on our way to Labrador City. We’ve been cautioned to watch for empty lumber trucks speeding along and moose crossing the road. And so we will.

The adventure continues!

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Oh The Wonder!

Lately I’ve been trying to see the world through the eyes of a child…with wonder at the incredible magic of the place in which we live.

This past weekend, I had an experience that was truly wonder-filled.

As a flock of fifty Canada geese made their way to the water’s edge, I noticed one had unusual markings. It was the same size as the rest of the geese, but its head was white, and its neck was mottled grey and white. It also had a light-coloured bill and pinkish feet. The underbelly of this goose was also predominantly white. Yet for all its differences, it was accepted as one of the tribe.

Later, after checking the bird book, and getting some photos, we determined that it was likely a Blue-morph Snow goose. Clearly it had missed an exit on its migration path!

Imagine seeing a Snow goose in southern Ontario in the summer! Oh the wonder!

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Canada goose and possible Blue-morph Snow goose – June 19, 2016, southern Ontario (photo by Ralph Morgan)